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Two Questions

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Proteus View Drop Down
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  Quote Proteus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Two Questions
    Posted: 31 October 2010 at 18:52

I have recently noticed that i seem to have an infestation of very small white bugs. First conclusion would be thrips, however they havent shown any leaf damage at all. Infact they dont seem to want to live anywhere outside of my rooting cubes, which i guess are made of peat. They are reasonably fast moving, look like thrips and jump like fleas..

Anybody id that ? :)
 
Second q, whats a good item to use to pollenate flowers, is there any reason i cant just dab my finger in the pollen and spread it onto the pistels?
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  Quote C_weed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 October 2010 at 20:22
The movement and jumping would lead me to believe thrips as well, but most problems that I hear about in rooting cubes are larvae. But once again, fly larvae wouldn't be hoping around as far as I know. I'd use a vine weevil insecticide, and just water it into the pots.

As far as the pollen goes it would definitely be possible to use a finger, however if you are just trying to pollinate one bud and keep the seeds to a minimum on the rest of the plant, getting a small paintbrush would be a good investment as the bristles would hold the pollen more efficiently.

Just some thoughts!

I love plants.
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  Quote Proteus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 01:10
So you can confirm that thrips cant jump? I think that what ever they are, they came with the cubes. Only reason i dont think they are thrips is there no leaf dmg. Obvioulsy its a cutting in the cube and they are only small i would know instantly if a leaf got eaten :)
 
If the surface of the cube drys out they all go deepr so once the plants are bigger ill just dry them out i think and hopefully that will be the end of it.
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  Quote farmer mick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 02:49
They're called Springtails. They're fairly harmless. They eat decaying organic matter and micro-organisms, but they won't touch healthy roots. Add neem oil with your next feed and you shouldn't see them again. If they do survive, give 'em another blast in one week and that should take care of them.

Re: pollination. Collect the pollen in a small plastic bag. Cover the bud you want to pollinate with the bag, hold the end closed with your fingers and shake.
"A rat race is for rats. We're not rats. We're human beings." - Jimmy Reid, RIP
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  Quote farmer mick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 02:55
Springtails:

"A rat race is for rats. We're not rats. We're human beings." - Jimmy Reid, RIP
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  Quote Proteus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 17:45
Cheers farmer mick, thats the ones. I been reading it says a 1% dishsoap solution will drown them. I also found this
 
"Some species of springtails may damage plants by chewing on the roots and stems of healthy seedlings. The plants attacked normally are found in overly wet and acidic soil. The seedlings may appear wilted and, if too young, may die. Damage occurs as minute, rounded pits on young roots."
 
so yeah that pretty much decided it for me :) quoted from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ig124
 
 
I got my pollen in a film case. I dont dare put it in my fridge because of humidity levels. The male is long gone. I was wondering aswell, does the age of the flowers matter when they are polenated? Is the flower ready to go as soon as its put out pistels?
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  Quote C_weed Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 19:30
You can freeze the pollen. As long as it isn't thawed and unthawed multiple times I'm pretty sure it can be stored in there for months. I believe that once pistils are present, even only a couple of weeks into flowering, reproduction can occur, however, the more pistils there are the more seeds you will have and the better the chance becomes of having viable choices. I'd pollinate when the buds are covered in stiff, white or whiteish pistils.
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  Quote Proteus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 November 2010 at 23:52
I know you can freeze it, but you cant freeze it in my fridge cause any sealed package in there ,even vacuum sealed, gets condensation inside. How it manages that i have no idea :)
 
lol i think im gonna get a new fridge.
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  Quote farmer mick Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 November 2010 at 00:01
Any healthy, white pistil can be pollinated. It takes 5-6 weeks for seeds to mature after pollination.

Wet and acidic soil will cause the roots to rot - that's why the springtails might eat them. As far as I know, they will not damage healthy roots.

I have seen springtails in the soil virtually ever time I grow a plant - including normal houseplants. They come in lots of shapes and colours, but I've only ever seen the white ones.

In nature, they are found in their millions in topsoil across the globe. They are "one of the main biological agents responsible for the control and the dissemination of soil microorganisms", so their presence can actually be beneficial to plants - just like earthworms.

"Soil springtails play a positive role in the establishment of plant-fungal symbioses and thus are beneficial to agriculture. They also contribute to controlling plant fungal diseases through their active consumption of mycelia and spores of damping-off and pathogenic fungi." (Thank you Wikipedia.)

Having said that, it's not nice when you water your plants and you see hundreds of the little bastards jumping around the place...
"A rat race is for rats. We're not rats. We're human beings." - Jimmy Reid, RIP
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  Quote Penguin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 April 2013 at 22:04
Thought I'd bump this up - sorry - with this link I found. I have a very abundant population of Springtails and was contemplating all sorts of drastic measures and even partially blamed them for the low yield of my last (first ever) crop - thinking they were larvae feeding on the roots.

In fact it seems they ain't so bad! Hurrah.

University study linked here, so pretty decent level:
http://www1.extension.umn.edu/garden/insects/find/springtails/
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